Tagged: criminal justice system

Welcome to the New Pace Criminal Justice Blog

We are excited to introduce our newly re-designed Pace Criminal Justice blog. Our blog now lives at http://pcjc.blogs.pace.edu and we welcome you to update your bookmarks, favorites, and any website listings.

This revision was part of a larger updating effort at the University. The only major difference from the prior web address is that our new URL does not contain the word ‘law.’ Everything else is and will remain the same. We will continue to bring you criminal law and procedure posts on domestic and international issues. And we will be returning to our regular blogging schedule as of September 1, 2016. As we did in prior years, we followed a more abbreviated summer schedule this year.

We welcome you to get involved by either leaving us a comment about what you think or even considering to submit a post. We very much appreciate your readership, and we look forward to continue this important online resource.

Student Perspective: Making A Murderer Event

POST WRITTEN BY: Danielle Petretta (’17), J.D. Pace Law School

On March 2, 2016, Pace Law School’s Criminal Justice Society, Student Bar Association, and the Criminal Justice Institute held an event on the controversial and popular Netflix 10-episode documentary, “Making a Murderer.” The documentary centers on a man named Steven Avery, who found himself stuck deep in the trenches of our criminal justice legal system within a very small knit rural community in Wisconsin.

Steven Avery spent 18 years in prison for a crime he did not commit and in 2003 was finally exonerated. This case received much attention including an effort to pass a bill – the Avery Bill – implementing checks and balances regarding police interrogations, handling and testing of DNA evidence, and policies surrounding an eye witness identification procedures to prevent wrongful convictions.  However, his nightmares continued, as just two years later he was arrested for the murder of 25-year-old photographer Teresa Halbach. Steven Avery’s nephew, Brenden Dassey, was also arrested for partaking in the Halbach murder. Both Steven Avery and Brenden Dassey remain in prison to date and Steven Avery continues to claim his innocence this time around as well. It is yet to be determined what the status of their appeal is, and the documentary leaves gaping concerns and questions to be answered. The documentary maps Steven Avery’s unfortunate journey through the legal system to date and takes the viewer on a shocking ride.

Did the fact that the Avery’s lived in Manitowoc County, a small knit community, affect the way in which they were treated? Did the appearances and social status of the Avery and Dassey families play an influential role in their prosecutions? Why was the police department involved in the first case able to have a continued presence and involvement in the subsequent Halbach case? Was the evidence tampered with? Were proper police procedures followed? Did someone tipped off the woman who found Teresa Halback’s car in the Avery’s 4,000 car lot within just a few minutes? Why was the same judge deciding Avery’s motion for a new trial when he had been the presiding judge in his trial? What happened in the jury room? Why was the key, one main piece of evidence against Avery, found days after the seventh search?

The discussion panel held at this fabulous event consisted of professors, former prosecutors, and the Greenburg Chief of Police. Professors of professional responsibility, criminal procedure and criminal practice  provided valuable feedback responding to many of the questions continuously discussed. After the initial introduction of the topic by the panelists, the room flooded with questions and comments about the documentary, what it portrayed as well as what it didn’t establish. Discussions and comments about the police work sparked much attention among the crowd of students and current attorneys, and critiques and opinion regarding the prosecution and defense lawyers’ conduct triggered a heated response from the audience.

This discussion panel coupled with the audience forum offered an amazing opportunity for students, attorneys, professors, and community members to debate and challenge the current criminal justice legal system that is so embedded within our society.

Related Readings:

REMINDER: PCJI Presents Making A Murderer Discussion

making a murdererPlease join the Pace Criminal Justice Institute (PCJI) on Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 6:00-9:00 PM in the Pace Law School Moot Court Room for an eventLegal, Ethical and Practical Issues: A Panel Discussion on the Netflix Documentary Series ‘Making A Murderer’. Join us as panelists including Professors Carol BarryDavid DorfmanLissa GriffinJill Gross, and alumnus Chris McNerney (’06), Chief of Greenburgh Police, discuss the legal and ethical issues raised by this documentary. Attendees can earn up to 3.5 CLE credits (1.5 ethics and 2.0 professional practice).

Related Readings:

REMINDER: PCJI Presents Making A Murderer Discussion

making a murdererPlease join the Pace Criminal Justice Institute (PCJI) on Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 6:00-9:00 PM in the Pace Law School Moot Court Room for an eventLegal, Ethical and Practical Issues: A Panel Discussion on the Netflix Documentary Series ‘Making A Murderer’. Join us as panelists including Professors Carol BarryDavid Dorfman, Lissa Griffin, Jill Gross, and alumnus Chris McNerney (’06), Chief of Greenburgh Police, discuss the legal and ethical issues raised by this documentary. Attendees can earn up to 3.5 CLE credits (1.5 ethics and 2.0 professional practice).

Related Readings:

PCJI Presents Making A Murderer Discussion

MaMPlease join the Pace Criminal Justice Institute on Wednesday, March 2, 2016 at 6:00-9:00 PM in the Pace Law School Moot Court Room for an event: Legal, Ethical and Practical Issues: A Panel Discussion on the Netflix Documentary Series ‘Making A Murderer’. Join us as panelists including Professors Carol Barry, David Dorfman, and Lissa Griffin, and alumnus Chris McNerney (’06), Chief of Greenburgh Police, discuss the legal and ethical issues raised by this documentary. Attendees can earn up to 3.5 CLE credits (1.5 ethics and 2.0 professional practice).

Related Readings: